Tech Stuff

Teall & Associates

We’re popping champagne corks again here at tom-mcgee.com world headquarters (ouch! watch where you’re pointing that!) as a new site launches for Teall & Associates.

Nothing fancy here; in fact the client direction was to do exactly the opposite. Jon is running a PR agency targeting major financial firms, so he wanted something really staid. So I put my energy into clean typography, nice white space, and use of the color “teal” (get it?). The non-fussiness goes all the way down to the HTML/CSS, which is very clean.

I started with a full reset of all the browser settings to build up all the elements from the ground up. Getting rid of all the variations in sizes and weights that the browsers don’t agree on gives you a head start in making the site look the same across all of them. Plus there were some positive side effects: I was especially pleased to get headline fonts that are thin and elegant.

The HTML has a minimal number of elements — three main divs, a list for the navigation, and the page content. The Curvy Corners package was used to make the rounded tabs in the navigation.

Photos are from fotosearch.com, a pretty reasonably priced stock house.

Tom
Tom McGee has been building web sites since 1995, and blogging here since 2006. Currently a senior developer at Seton Hall University, he's also a freelance web programmer and musician. Contact him if you have the need for a blog, web site, redesign or custom programming!

3 thoughts on “Teall & Associates

  1. Tom, what is the significance of the color teal on a website? No, i don’t get it. But the comapny i work for is revamping their website and i told them to use our company color which isn’t quite teal, but a color less intense than teal but not turquoise. I dunno wtf color it is.

    The company is an interior design company so would a teal-like color help us or hurt us?

  2. Well the guy’s name is Teall and he really wanted the play on words. So “Teall” became “Teal.” To figure out what to use — it’s kind of a vague color word when you think about it — we checked the old Netscape list from around 1996. Back then if you were smart you limited yourself to the color-safe palette and Netscape had come up with names for each of them. So we found the one called, yes, “teal” and used it.

    But bottom line, unless the head decorator’s last name is “Teal” or some variant thereof, use your best judgment. I think using teal or turquoise will be fine unless you show really bad taste by combining it with orange or something else that clashes.

  3. Whoops i missed that the guys name was Teall. Well, i’m not the one doing the website, but i did submit 20 ideas for improvement to the boss which he is going to give the guy. I don’t particularly like the color, it’s so 80’s. But if that’s the color of his logo and sign and the trim on his building then that’s the color. (shrug)

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