Family Science Travelogues

Great Lakes Science Center

A fun science museum right on the shore of Lake Erie, next door to the Rock and  Hall of Fame.

For me, science geek that I am, the coolest thing there was this Apollo crew module. It didn’t go to the moon, but was part of a 1973 Skylab mission. Still. It orbited the Earth more than 800 times, and splashed down safely 200 miles off of San Diego. You can see the erosion from the heat of re-entry all around the bottom.

The door is removed so you can see inside, and is laid inside-up next to it. It’s full of beautifully machined screws, latches and handles.

On the other hand, the inside of the crew module itself is about as un-futuristic and non-science-fiction as you can imagine.

Upstairs are a bunch of exhibits and hands-on demos that let us re-experience our childhood. Here’s C. dodging a beach ball under the Bernoulli effect.

Afterwards, we went over to the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame. They actively discourage any kind of photos inside, so we settled for this one outside. C. will be working at this year’s induction ceremony, so this was good preparation for her busy work week.

Tom
Tom McGee has been building web sites since 1995, and blogging here since 2006. Currently a senior developer at Seton Hall University, he's also a freelance web programmer and musician. Contact him if you have the need for a blog, web site, redesign or custom programming!

3 thoughts on “Great Lakes Science Center”

  1. From what I remember, the space hardware in there was remarkable to me for how ordinary it seemed. I mean it looked like it was built by very smart people with the best materials in their basement,

  2. The machining of the metal parts is beautiful. Look closely at the inside of the door — it’s almost artistic. But the inside of the cabin itself looks almost dystopian.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *